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THIRD TERM MATHEMATICS SCHEME OF WORK FOR PRIMARY THREE (3)

THEME: Measurement and geometry

SUB THEME: WHOLE NUMBER

WEEK 1: Measurement of Lengths with Natural Measures and Comparison of Estimates with Actual Measurement.

TEACHER’S ACTIVITIES:

  1. Teachers reminds pupils that in the past, parts of the body such as foot, handspan, arms pan cut or arm length were used in measuring length.
  2. She calls some pupils to measure their desks or tables using handspans.
  3. She records their results in a tabular form for pupils to see which child has the longest span and who has the shortest span.
  4. She gets pupils to estimate the lengths of various objects in their class.
  5. She explains to pupils, the need for standard measuring units: the centimeter and meter.

PUPILS ACTIVITIES

  1. Pupils mention the parts of the body that were used in measuring length.
  2. They discover which child has the longest span and who has the shortest span.
  3. They measure their desks or tables with hand spans.
  4. They estimate the lengths of various objects in the class.

TEACHING/LEARNING RESOURCES/AIDS

  1. Ropes
  2. Taps
  3. Rulers
  4. Desks
  5. Tables

WEEK 2: Measuring and finding the perimeter of regular figures in centimeters and meters.

TEACHER’S ACTIVITIES:

  1. Teacher guides pupils to discuss the disadvantages in the use of non – standard units of measurement in respect of length. E.g. the hanspans used by each pupils in the previous activity is different from each other.
  2. She shows the pupils a 15 or 30 centimeter ruler, a meter ruler and a tape measure, she explains that those units do not change and they are the same everywhere.
  3. She teaches pupils the short form for meter(m) and for centimeter(cm).
  4. She leads pupils to study a ruler and tells them that the long marks on it shows half – centimeters.
  5. She collects cut- outs of regular shapes such as square, rectangle and triangle to the class.
  6. She asks two or three pupils to measure the two measure the two lengths and two breadths of her table and adds the results.
  7. She asks pupils to pick their regular shapes and measure all distances and record their results.

PUPILS ACTIVITIES:

  1. Pupils discuss the use of non- standard units of measurement in respect to length.
  2. They measure the distances round the objects given to them and record their results. E.g. teacher’s tables.  Class board. Classroom, etc.
  3. They measure the distances round their cut –out squares, rectangles and triangles.
  4. They record their results in tabular form.
  5. They learn that the distance round a plane shape or object Is called perimeter.
    TEACHING/LEARNING RESOURCES/AIDS:
  6. Ropes
  7. Tapes
  8. Rulers
  9. Desks
  10. Cut – out of squares, rectangle s and triangles.
  11. Teacher’s table.

WEEK 3: Comparing Non – Standard Measures E.G. Arm’s Length.

TEACHER’S ACTIVITIES:

  1. Teacher asks pupils to measure the length of the class room with their “foot” and ‘arm’s length’ and record their results.
  2. She leads them to find out the difference in arm’s length and other non- standard measure used.
  3. She asks pupils to use meter rule to measure some objects in the class.
  4. She emphasizes the importance of standard units as opposed to natural units of measurement.
  5. She leads pupils to identify the need for standardized units of measure within the society.

PUPILS ACTIVITIES:

  1. Pupils measure the length of their class –room with their “foot” an “arm’s length” and compare their result results with one another.
  2. They find the difference in arms lengths and other non – standard measures.
  3. They use meter rule to measure some objects in the class room.
  4. They note the importance of standard units as opposed to natural units of measurement.
  5. They identify the need for standardized unit of measurement.

TEACHING/LEARNING RESOURCES/AIDS:

  1. Arm length
  2. Foot and other non – standard measures.
  3. Meter rule
  4. 15 or 30 cm ruler
  5. Classroom
  6. Other objects in the class.

WEEK 4: Time (Time on the clock)

TEACHER’S ACTIVITIES

  1. Teacher uses real clock or clock chart to demonstrate to the pupils how to tell time.

She reminds them that the short hand is the hour hand and the long hand is the minuite hand.

  • She explains that when the minute hand is on 12, we know that it is a full time. We read the time from the short time which tells the hour.
  • Teacher leads the pupils to notice  that starting at 12 and stopping at 12, when they counts the dots in fives all the dots in fives, all the marks on the clock are 60.

I.e. there are 60 minutes in one hour.

  • She leads the pupils to tell time and guides them through activities involving telling the time in minutes.
  • She shows pupils how to tell time in hours and minutes.

PUPILS ACTIVITIES

  1. Pupils listen to the teacher’s explanation.
  2. They tell time in hours e.g. time is 6’o clock’ ‘the time is 4 o’clock”.
  3. They use their clock faces to tell the time using “quarter past”

E.g. “quarter past seven” and “quarter to three”

  • They use their clock faces to tell the time in minutes e.g. 23 minutes past 9 or 18 minutes past 9 or 18 minutes to 10.
  • They draw and record time in their exercise books.

TEACHING/LEARNING RESOURCES/AIDS

  1. Clock charts
  2. Real clock

WEEK 5: Calendar- Reading of the Days of the Week, Months of the Year and Dates.

TEACHER’S ACTIVITIES

  1. Teacher displays a calendar on the board and guides pupils to name and arrange days of the week.
  • She asks pupils to identify the days and dates when certain event like Christmas, new year, Easter, Id – el – kabir, National Day, children’s day are celebrated.
  • She leads pupils to discover that the number of days in each month varies.
  • She teaches them the poem below to know the months with 30 days, those with 31 days and February with 28 days clear and 29 days in each leap year.

    Poem

30 days have September, April, June and November. All the rest are 31, except February alone which has 28 days clear and 29 days in each leap year.

  • She guides pupils on how to read and write dates i.e. day, month, year or month, day, year.
  • She asks pupils to write the number of days in each month and the number of month in each year.
  • She leads pupils to identify the use of time and dates in daily life activities.
  •  

PUPILS ACTIVITIES

  1. Pupils name and arrange days of the week.
  2. They identify the days and dates when certain events are celebrated.
  3. They observe that the number of days in each month varies.
  4. They learn how to read and write dates.
  5. They write the number of days in each month and the number of months in each year.

TEACHING/LEARNING RESOURCES/AIDS

  1. calendar

WEEK 6: Weight introduction of grams and kilograms.

TEACHER’S ACTIVITIES

  1. If possible, teacher guides pupils to measure their weights in turns using weighting scales.
  2. She uses hand balancing, improved scale or bathroom scale to obtain and compare the weights of some objects in the class.
  3. She explains that the weights of small objects like packets of biscuits, sugar, tins of milk are expressed in the grams, while the weight s of heavy objects like stones, human beings, cows, etc. are expressed in kilograms.
  4. She guides pupils to measure weight of some rocks and minerals.
  5. She explains further that 1 kilogram contains 1000 grams.
  6. She leads pupils to apply the grams and kilograms as standard units of measure for transaction.

PUPILS ACTIVITIES

  1. Pupils measure their weights and record them
  2. They obtain the weights of various small objects in the class and record results in their note books.
  3. They note that the weights of small objects like packets of sugar, tins of milk are expressed in grams while the weights of heavy objects such as cow, a human being are expressed in kilogram.
  4. They weight some of the rocks and minerals samples.
  5. They apply grams and kilograms as standard fort transportations.

TEACHING/LEARNING RESOURCES/AIDS

  1. A scale or balance
  2. Tins of milk and tomatoes puree
  3. Packets of sugar, tins of beverage, etc.
  4. Samples of different rocks and stones, e.g. clay, marble, etc.

WEEK 7: Capacity – Identifying Litre as a Unit of Measuring Capacity

TEACHER’S ACTIVITIES

  1. If possible, teacher collects objects such as syringes of different capacities, graduated cylinders and empty container.
  2. She reminds pupils that the amount of liquids as a container can hold is known as its capacity.
  3. She leads pupils to identify the litre as a unit of measuring capacity of containers such as the ones used in measuring liquids e.g. petrol, kerosene, oil, etc.
  4. She guides pupils to learn the following:
  5. 10 millilitres (ml)  = 1 centilitre (cl)
  6. 10 centilitres (cl) = 1 decilitre (dl)
  7. 10 decilitres (dl) = 1 litre (L)
  8. 1000 litres =  1 kilolitre (kl)

PUPILS ACTIVITIES

  1. Pupils recall the meaning of capacity.
  2. They identify he litre as a unit of measuring capacity.
  3. They study and copy the information on units or litres.
  4. Pupils participate in the activity of filling a graduated cylinder with water up to the level of litres required
  5. They identify the need for accuracy in measuring liquids e.g. water, kerosene, petrol, etc.

TEACHING/LEARNING RESOURCES/AIDS

  1. Objects such as empty used syringes, battles, graduated cylinder, empty containers, water, etc.

WEEK 8: Measuring Liquids with Graduated Cylinder Up To Any Stated Number of Litres.

TEACHER’S ACTIVITIES

  1. Teacher briefly looks back at “identifying litre as a unit of measuring capacity”.
  2. She drills pupils on the units for measuring liquids. She tells them that the most commonly used units are the millilitres (the smallest units), centiletres and litres.
  3. Using appropriate containers, she measures capacity in litres, centilitres and millilitrers and guides pupils to do the same.
  4. She guides pupils to fill a graduated cylinder with water up to the level the number of litres required.
  5. She guides pupils to identify the need for accuracy in measuring liquids such as water, kerosene, petrol, etc.

PUPILS ACTIVITIES

  1. Pupils participate in the revision exercise
  2. They mention the units for measuring capacity.
  3. Pupils measure capacity in litre, centilitres and mililitres.
  4. Pupils measures into the graduated cylinder and calculate the number of it that will fill a given container.
  5. They identify the need for accuracy in measuring liquids e.g. kerosene, petrol, water.

TEACHING/LEARNING RESOURCES/AIDS

  1. Objects such as empty used syringes, battles, graduated cylinder, empty containers, water, etc.

                                     WEEK 9:

Theme: Mensuration and Geometry

Sub – theme: Shapes

  1.  folding symmetry
  2. Properties of squares, rectangles and triangles.

TEACHER’S ACTIVITIES

  1. Teacher holds up cut –out shapes of a kite and a square and in turns, demonstrates to the pupils that a plane shape is said to show symmetry if it is possible to divide into two matching halves. The dividing line is called the line of symmetry. Etc.
  2. A kite has one line of symmetry
  3. A square has 4 lines of symmetry.
  4. She leads pupils to identify lines of symmetry in everyday life.
  5. She asks pupils to collect plane shape and fold them to determine the lines of symmetry.
  6. She guides pupils to identify the properties of squares, rectangles and triangles in respect of the number of sides, corners, lines of symmetry, equal lines, “square corners”, etc.
  7. She guides pupils to record properties of each plane shape.
  8. She leads pupils to identify various shapes in everyday life.

PUPILS ACTIVITIES

  1. Pupils observe and listen to the teacher to know what lines of symmetry are.
  2. They identify lines of symmetry in everyday life.
  3. They fold various plane shapes to determine their lines of symmetry
  4. They identify the properties of squares, rectangles and triangles.
  5. They identify various shapes in our environment.

TEACHING/LEARNING RESOURCES/AIDS

  1. Objects with plane shapes such as leaves, pictures, cut –out- of squares, rectangle and triangle.
  2. Ruler, pencil, broom, sticks, straight edges squares, cornered shapes, coins, etc.

WEEK 10: Symmetry

  1. Cures and straight lines
  2. Drawing of squares, rectangle, triangles and circles.

TEACHER’S ACTIVITIES

  1. Teacher briefly looks back at folding symmetry and the properties of squares, rectangles and triangles.
  2. She explains to pupils that a line is a long thin mark on surface. a line may be straight.
  3. She joins any two points on the board using a ruler to draw a straight line ——- and direct pupils to do the same in their exercise books.
  4. She shows pupils how to draw curves.
  5. She directs pupils to draw to each: squares, rectangles, triangles and circle using a ruler, square cornered shapes, circular tins and coins.
  6. She emphasizes on different types of triangles.

PUPILS ACTIVITIES

  1. Pupils participate in the revision exercise.
  2. They listen to teachers explanation
  3. They draw different lines using any two points with a ruler or straight edge
  4. They draw curves.
  5. They mention the differences between a straight line and a curve.
  6. They draw each of the shapes in their exercise books using given materials.
  7. They mention the presence of straight lines and curves in everyday life.
  8. They mention the different types of triangles.

TEACHING/LEARNING RESOURCES/AIDS

  1. Objects with plane shapes such as leaves, pictures, cut –out- of squares, rectangle and triangle.
  2. Ruler, pencil, broom, sticks, straight edges squares, cornered shapes, coins, etc.

Theme: Everyday Statistics

Sub –theme: Data Collection and Presentation

WEEK 11: Pictograms

TEACHER’S ACTIVITIES

  1. In a simple language, the teacher describes a pictogram as a way of representing information in the form of little pictures.
  2. She leads pupils to read information on the prepared pictograms.
  3. She record the information.
  4. She draws a pictogram of the number of boys in primaries 1 -3 of a private school.
  5. She tells pupils that at times one symbol can represent any given number

e.g. Ʌ can represent 5 pupils or more or less.

  • She guides pupils to represent information involving everyday life in a pictogram.
  • Teacher explains to pupils that in that in a set of numbers, the numbers that occurs most often is the mode. Example.
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9 — mode is 3
  • 3, 4,4,4,7,7,8   —— mode is 4
  • She guides pupils to find the mode in a pictogram.
  • She leads pupils to mention the usefulness and applications of mode in real life.

PUPILS ACTIVITIES

  • Pupils listen to teacher’s explanation
  • They read information on the pictogram
  • They record the information
  • They represent information involving everyday life in pictograms
  • They learn the meaning of mode and how to identify it in a set of numbers.
  • They find the mode in a pictogram
  • They mention the usefulness and applications of mode in real life.

TEACHING/LEARNING RESOURCES/AIDS

  1. Cardboard of pictograms arranged vertically and horizontally.
  2. Cut – outs of pictures for pictograms.
  3. Pictograms with one mode for each pictogram.

WEEK 12: REVIEW OF FIRST TERM’S WORKS

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